Please select your home edition
Edition
Auckland On Water Boat Show

The jet stream's influence on extreme storms

by British Antarctic Survey on 19 Apr 2013
Dr. Christian Franzke, of British Antarctic Survey British Antarctic Survey © http://www.antarctica.ac.uk
A new analysis of Europe’s extreme storm events reveals that they often occur near the jet stream – the fast flowing air currents that flow high in the Earth’s atmosphere.

The study further reveals that storms also bunch together in time – with extreme events sometimes happening closer to each other than traditional weather predictions would suggest. This bunching can then have a knock-on effect of leaving a larger gap than predicted between those events and the following storm cluster.

In a paper published this week in a special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, Dr Christian Franzke, of British Antarctic Survey, examines the impact of the North Atlantic jet stream on extreme wind speeds and storms in Europe.

The impact of natural hazards that can cause significant damage in economic and human terms is of great interest to Government, business and society. European wind storms rank as one of the major causes of global natural catastrophe insurance losses.

The scientific community strives to improve models and predictions. This requires a deep understanding of the pattern and frequency of extreme storm events.

Dr Franzke’s analysis of weather station and satellite data for the North Atlantic and European region between 1958 to 2001 leads him to conclude that the jet stream exerts an influence on wind speeds and that the clustering of storms in time is not just down to coincidence. He says,

'The point was to see if the bunching together of extreme storms is more than just due to chance like a roll of the dice - to see if there is a systematic process leading to clustering. I wanted to find out what might be considered to be the ‘normal’ pattern and see if there was a connection between storms and the jet stream. The data show that storm clusters often follow the track of the jet stream. This is a new step forward in our understanding of this complex and complicated process. This research will help forecasting future storm events and is particularly important because we expect to see an increase in the intensity of storms due to climate British Antarctic Survey
Hella Marine - July 2016GAC Pindar Superyacht ServicesBarz Optics - Floaters

Related Articles

TowBoatUS Ocean City removes harmful fishing nets
Earlier this summer, three miles of open water was all that separated two efforts to protect and nurture marine life Earlier this summer, three miles of open water was all that separated two efforts to protect and nurture marine life on the Atlantic Coast.
Posted on 12 Aug
WHO statement on Zika virus
The third meeting of the EC convened by the Director-General under IHR 2005 regarding microcephaly and Zika virus The third meeting of the Emergency Committee (EC) convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR 2005) regarding microcephaly, other neurological disorders and Zika virus was held by teleconference on 14 June 2016, from 13:00 to 17:15 Central European Time.
Posted on 16 Jun
Have your say at Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Bioregion assessment
Marine Estate Management Authority undertakes assessment to develop options to enhance marine biodiversity conservation. The Marine Estate Management Authority has developed eight suggested management initiatives to enhance marine biodiversity conservation and help reduce priority threats.
Posted on 14 Apr
Zika virus situation report
From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. Cuba and Dominica are the latest to report autochthonous (local) transmission of Zika virus on 14 and 15 March, respectively. Five of these countries and territories reported a Zika virus outbreak that is now over.
Posted on 2 Apr
Reef sharks take small bites
Coral reef sharks eat prey that are smaller than a cheeseburger Sharks have a reputation for having voracious appetites, but a new study shows that most coral reef sharks eat prey that are smaller than a cheeseburger
Posted on 20 Mar
What kind of damage can micro-plastics do?
We look into plastics escape from our household drains and what kind of damage they can do to marine life Although microbeads from rinse off cosmetics have received a lot of attention lately, the tiny plastics most often being found in our seafood are a different kind of synthetic. We look into marine life in the US and Australia, to find out what plastics escape our household drains and what kind of damage they can do.
Posted on 18 Mar
Suburbs to Sea - Stopping litter at the source
Over sixty people gathered at Point Cook Community Centre for a special ‘Movies and Muffins’ night to learn about litter Over sixty people gathered at Point Cook Community Centre recently for a special ‘Movies and Muffins’ night to learn about litter and its impact on the environment as part of Wyndham City’s Green Living Series.
Posted on 18 Mar
Good radio communication tips - Video
Good communications could make all the difference in an emergency at sea. Here's some great basic communication tips Good communications could make all the difference in an emergency at sea. Here's some great basic communication tips from Scott Walker and Mal Williams from Outdoors Group.
Posted on 10 Mar
We can fix the Great Barrier Reef
Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore the Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies that focus on science, protection and conservation.
Posted on 20 Feb
Great Barrier Reef marine reserves combat coral disease
A new and significant role for marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef has been revealed A new and significant role for marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef has been revealed, with researchers finding the reserves reduce the prevalence of coral diseases.
Posted on 20 Feb