Please select your home edition
Edition
Bavaria Cruiser 34 728x90

Sport fishing in Montauk takes the ultimate turn, saving sharks

by John Bell on 26 Jul 2013
Historic Montauk Marine Basin John Bell
In 1951 a young Frank Mundus settled in Montauk and got the idea to offer charter fishing for sharks. Nobody paid much attention to him. But by the time Mundus and team harpooned a 4500-pound great white, in 1964, anglers were paying serious attention, as well as a writer named Peter Benchley. The movie 'Jaws' was released in 1975 and everybody wanted to come to Montauk to go Monster Fishing for sharks. Big money tournaments started to take hold.

Cut to the late 1990’s, when disturbing videos started to appear. Sharks were shown being finned alive by foreign commercial fishermen. They were being killed not by the thousands, but by the millions, to provide fins for shark fin soup for the growing Asian market. Shark populations started to decline, and by the mid 2000s were no longer sustainable.

Before he died in 2006, Benchley said, 'Knowing what I know now, I could never write that book today. Sharks don't target human beings, and they certainly don't hold grudges.' And Frank Mundus pleaded for the use of circle hooks, regretting ruthless practices and becoming a conservationist.

Today the great apex predators of the ocean face extinction, and so do the charter boat captains who catch them.

That’s why Carl Darenberg, owner of Montauk Marine Basin, artist April Gornik, and the Concerned Citizens of Montauk, working with the Montauk Boatmen, Inc., the Montauk Chamber of Commerce, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, OCEARCH, the Shark Brothers, and Mote Marine Laboratory are proud to present Shark’s Eye.

'All sharks caught in this tournament will be released and only circle hooks can be used', Carl Darenberg said. Eligible mako, thresher and blue sharks will be fitted with satellite tracking tags, which will monitor their movements after release. The anglers who catch them get to name three tagged sharks, and a fourth will be named by Montauk school children. The public will be able to follow these fish online via the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker.

To ensure a highly competitive, exciting and informative event for both anglers and the general public, in addition to satellite tagging of certain fish, a system of best practices and modern catch and release protocols have been engineered into this tournament format to maximize the post-release welfare and survivability of all sharks caught during this competition. These methods include the mandatory use of inline circle hooks to help prevent internal hooking, heavy tackle and line strengths to reduce a shark's time on the line, and other specific handling procedures designed to ensure angler safety and healthy shark releases. Anglers and Observers will receive personal training on these methods, prior to competition.

The Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation (GHOF) is providing $10,000 in prize money and April Gornik is providing an original work of art to the winner.

However, everybody wins. That’s because all profits from this tournament will go to charity!

There will be fun and excitement for the entire family all weekend long featuring a film and music festival, along with interactive exhibits attended by sponsors, notable personalities and organizations. Onshore activities surrounding the tournament will provide a unique opportunity for all ages to enjoy a beautiful weekend in Montauk, while being treated to an engaging and entertaining look at modern marine and shark conservation.

For more information on the next chapter in Montauk fishing lore, 'Shark’s Eye — a fishing tournament designed to save sharks', visit Sharks Eye Tournament.
Barz Optics - San Juan Worlds Best EyewearGAC Pindar Sailing NewsPantaenius - Worldwide Support

Related Articles

Fishing Space and Grand Pavois Fishing – Unique concept in boat shows
This space, created in 2008, has become a true platform for exchanges and discoveries between enthusiasts, visitors This space, created in 2008, has become a true platform for exchanges and discoveries between enthusiasts, visitors, brands accompanied by their competitors and pro staff, with its events platforms, its demonstration basins, its fishing village, its specific sales space run by Pro Pêche 17 network of shops (new in 2016), its fishing boat gallery, its marina, not to mention one of main highlights
Posted today at 10:02 am
The sound of a healthy reef
A new study from WHOI help researchers understand ways that marine larvae use sound as cue to settle on coral reefs A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs. The study, published on August 23rd in the online journal Scientific Reports, has determined that sounds created by adult fish and invertebrates may not travel far enough for larvae —which hatch in open ocean
Posted today at 6:49 am
The sound of a healthy reef
A new study from WHOI help researchers understand ways that marine larvae use sound as cue to settle on coral reefs A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs. The study, published on August 23rd in the online journal Scientific Reports, has determined that sounds created by adult fish and invertebrates may not travel far enough for larvae —which hatch in open ocean
Posted today at 6:49 am
A slithery ocean mystery
One sentence in a New York Times article caught Larry Pratt’s eye and set the scientific investigation in motion. One sentence in a New York Times article caught Larry Pratt’s eye and set the scientific investigation in motion. The story was about fishermen harvesting juvenile eels in coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine and selling them for more than $2,500 a pound, mostly for unagi in Asian fish markets.
Posted on 30 Aug
A slithery ocean mystery
One sentence in a New York Times article caught Larry Pratt’s eye and set the scientific investigation in motion. One sentence in a New York Times article caught Larry Pratt’s eye and set the scientific investigation in motion. The story was about fishermen harvesting juvenile eels in coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine and selling them for more than $2,500 a pound, mostly for unagi in Asian fish markets.
Posted on 30 Aug
New fishing season is a mere 30 days away
Time to start visualising the zing of a reel and bend of a rod, as the little hints of spring and summer start appearing Reports from around the regions (we would say this, of course) hint at some great fishing to be had, as the days lengthen and temperatures slowly rise!
Posted on 29 Aug
More net free fishing at Gippsland River Mouths
Migratory fish in Gippsland Lakes will have more protection at river mouths when exclusion areas for commercial netting Migratory fish in the Gippsland Lakes will have more protection at river mouths when exclusion areas for commercial netting are expanded by 50 per cent under new arrangements to be introduced next year by the Andrews Labor Government.
Posted on 26 Aug
Stacer’s Ocean Rangers are now tougher than ever
The new 589 Ocean Ranger now features more freeboard at 730mm, bringing the model in line with the rest of the range. Due to customer demand Stacer has released two new models in their plate range to now include the 589 and 619 Ocean Ranger Hard Tops offering a more budget friendly option that is still packed with power and strength.
Posted on 17 Aug
Shark 'trophy' hunters land in hot water
Two young men who removed the jaws of a dead Great White Shark have found themselves in trouble with the law. Two young men who removed the jaws of a dead Great White Shark have found themselves in trouble with the law.
Posted on 16 Aug
Port Phillip Bay Fishers gather to celebrate Bay fishing
Jaala Pulford welcomed key fishing industry representatives and recreational anglers to Port Phillip Bay Conference Minister for Agriculture, Jaala Pulford today welcomed key fishing industry representatives and recreational anglers to the first Port Phillip Bay Conference in Altona.
Posted on 13 Aug