Please select your home edition
Edition
InSunSport - International - GR

Locating the origin of Victoria’s King George whiting

by DPI Victoria on 14 Apr 2013
Variation in the chemistry of King George whiting otoliths is being used to determine the source population of Victorian whiting and the movement patterns of juvenile whiting among bays and inlets DPI Victoria .
In July 2011, Fisheries Victoria, the University of Melbourne, Deakin University and the South Australian Research and Development Institute initiated a 3-year research project to determine the source of Victoria’s King George whiting population and the movement patterns of juvenile whiting among Victorian bays and inlets.

Understanding the population structure of King George whiting in Victoria and how it relates to the South Australian whiting fishery will allow for optimal management of this important recreational and commercial species.

Previous research by Fisheries Victoria has indicated that:

• Spawning aggregations and young larvae are only found in South Australia
• The spawning source of whiting in Victorian bays and inlets is hundreds of kilometres to the west
• Whiting larvae can drift in the water column for 3-4 months allowing for large distances to be travelled.






The current research project will use two novel techniques:

• Otolith microchemistry: otoliths (earbones) in fish grow daily and absorb trace elements from the surrounding water. Trace elements are unique to specific water bodies, so we can determine if King George whiting from South Australia and Victoria were spawned or spent time in the same water body based on the trace metal variation in their otoliths. This technique will be used to determine the source population of Victorian whiting and the movement patterns of juvenile whiting among bays and inlets in Victoria.

• Genetics: microsatellite markers are small sequences in DNA that are inherited and can be used to determine family linkages. We will use microsatellite markers extracted from tissue to determine if there are genetic differences in the populations of whiting in South Australia and Victoria and among the bays and inlets in Victoria.

This research project is funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, the Victorian Department of Primary Industries and recreational fishing licence DPI Victoria

Kiwi Yachting - LewmarGAC Pindar Superyacht ServicesPantaenius - Worldwide Support

Related Articles

WHO statement on Zika virus
The third meeting of the EC convened by the Director-General under IHR 2005 regarding microcephaly and Zika virus The third meeting of the Emergency Committee (EC) convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR 2005) regarding microcephaly, other neurological disorders and Zika virus was held by teleconference on 14 June 2016, from 13:00 to 17:15 Central European Time.
Posted on 16 Jun
Have your say at Hawkesbury Shelf Marine Bioregion assessment
Marine Estate Management Authority undertakes assessment to develop options to enhance marine biodiversity conservation. The Marine Estate Management Authority has developed eight suggested management initiatives to enhance marine biodiversity conservation and help reduce priority threats.
Posted on 14 Apr
Zika virus situation report
From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. Cuba and Dominica are the latest to report autochthonous (local) transmission of Zika virus on 14 and 15 March, respectively. Five of these countries and territories reported a Zika virus outbreak that is now over.
Posted on 2 Apr
Reef sharks take small bites
Coral reef sharks eat prey that are smaller than a cheeseburger Sharks have a reputation for having voracious appetites, but a new study shows that most coral reef sharks eat prey that are smaller than a cheeseburger
Posted on 20 Mar
What kind of damage can micro-plastics do?
We look into plastics escape from our household drains and what kind of damage they can do to marine life Although microbeads from rinse off cosmetics have received a lot of attention lately, the tiny plastics most often being found in our seafood are a different kind of synthetic. We look into marine life in the US and Australia, to find out what plastics escape our household drains and what kind of damage they can do.
Posted on 18 Mar
Suburbs to Sea - Stopping litter at the source
Over sixty people gathered at Point Cook Community Centre for a special ‘Movies and Muffins’ night to learn about litter Over sixty people gathered at Point Cook Community Centre recently for a special ‘Movies and Muffins’ night to learn about litter and its impact on the environment as part of Wyndham City’s Green Living Series.
Posted on 18 Mar
Good radio communication tips - Video
Good communications could make all the difference in an emergency at sea. Here's some great basic communication tips Good communications could make all the difference in an emergency at sea. Here's some great basic communication tips from Scott Walker and Mal Williams from Outdoors Group.
Posted on 10 Mar
We can fix the Great Barrier Reef
Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies Leading coral reef scientists say Australia could restore the Great Barrier Reef to its former glory through better policies that focus on science, protection and conservation.
Posted on 20 Feb
Great Barrier Reef marine reserves combat coral disease
A new and significant role for marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef has been revealed A new and significant role for marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef has been revealed, with researchers finding the reserves reduce the prevalence of coral diseases.
Posted on 20 Feb
Tips for navigating turtle traffic
The moment a marine turtle hatchling pokes its head out of its sandy nest the odds are against it. The moment a marine turtle hatchling pokes its head out of its sandy nest the odds are against it, but beach goers can give these tiny creatures a better chance during their dash to the ocean.
Posted on 12 Feb