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Fishing guide 2013 - Fishing definitions

by Department of Primary Industries on 27 Apr 2013
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Outlined below are the fishing definitions provided by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Victoria, Australia.

Bag limit: The maximum number of a particular type of fish that a person may take on any one day.

Possession limit: The maximum number of a particular type of fish that a person can may possess at any time while in, on or next to Victorian waters. For fish other than protected aquatic biota or a priority species, a person may be able to possess a multiple day's catch if they can prove they took no more than the catch limit on each day. People fishing on multiple days should place each day's catch in a separate bag or container and mark it with their name, address and the date the fish were caught.

Carcass (scale fish): The body of a fish which is not cut or mutilated in any manner other than to remove the gut, gills or scales.

Carcass (sharks including elephant fish): The body of a shark or elephant fish which is not cut or mutilated in any manner other than to remove the gut and head forward and clear of the rear-most gill slit.

Carcass (spiny freshwater crayfish): The body of a crayfish which is not cut in any way other than to remove one or more legs or claws, or is not mutilated in any way other than the absence of one or more legs or claws.

Catch limit: A general term used to describe any limit on catching or possession of fish. Bag limits and possession limits are types of catch limits.

Scale fish: Species of fish with fins other than sharks, skates and rays.

Seasons: A ‘closed season’ for a particular species is a period during which you must not take, attempt to take or possess that species. Species for which there is a closed season may be fished only during their open season. Fish caught accidentally during the closed season must be released immediately with as little harm as possible.

Lake and river boundaries: For the purposes of regulations, the boundary between a lake and a river is the point at which the flowing water of the river meets the backed-up waters of the lake, regardless of the water level of the lake.

Inland waters are:
Any waterway from its mouth to its source and any inlet or lagoon connected with it; and
Any swamp, lake, lagoon, backwater, billabong, dam, river, stream or public water storage reservoir.

Inland waters do not include:
The Gippsland Lakes, Lower Lake of Mallacoota Inlet (see map 5), Lake Tyers (see map 7) and Wingan Inlet (which are considered marine waters).

Marine waters are:
The Gippsland Lakes, Lower Lake of Mallacoota Inlet (see map 5), Lake Tyers (see map 7) and Wingan Inlet; and
Victorian waters that are not inland waters such as (but not limited to) Port Phillip Bay, Western Port.

Note: Water on private property, such as farm dams, are neither inland nor marine waters.

Mouth: The imaginary line between the seaward banks of a river, lake or estuary, where;
Those waters meet the sea (for examples see maps 1 and 2).

Where those waters flow into a bay, inlet or lake that is defined as a marine water (eg. Gippsland Lakes, Wingan Inlet) (see map 3).

However the location of the inland/marine water boundary (mouth) differs for the following waterways (see maps 4-9).






















































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