Frankston fishing set to thrive with artificial reef

Fishing is booming again in Victoria because of the artificial reef program on Frankston Pier
The Victorian Government is slowly seeing the positive result of their artificial reef program at Frankston Pier with a significant increase of population of fishes in the area, Member for Frankston Geoff Shaw said on Wednesday.

Mr Shaw said the reef, along with another two installed in November in Port Phillip Bay, had been paid for with $400,000 of proceeds from the sale of recreational fishing licenses.

'The reef attracts more fish to the area by simply providing the right shelter and habitat,' Mr Shaw said.
'This is great news for recreational fishers who like to fish from Frankston Pier.

'The reefs should be rapidly colonised by marine life, providing immediate fishing opportunities this summer, but will take several years to reach their full angling potential.

'Snapper are likely to be one of the main species attracted to the reefs. Other species likely to occur on the reefs periodically include leatherjackets, pike, flathead, King George whiting, yellowtail scad, salmon, squid and silver trevally.'

The new reef is located in water three to four metres deep, within casting distance at the end of Frankston Pier.

It consists of a total of 99 dome shaped concrete reef modules of different sizes which are dropped into place. The reef modules range between 170 and 340 kilograms in weight and 50 to 60 centimetres in height. Each reef module has a number of holes and cavities in them to allow water flow and provide refuges for marine life.

The reef, established for land based anglers, complements three recreational fishing reefs previously established within the bay for boat-based anglers.

Mr Shaw said Fisheries Victoria, within the Department of Primary Industries, was committed to establishing another eight similar recreational fishing reefs in Victorian bays and estuaries over the next two years.

'Site selection for these reefs is underway and we welcome any suggestions for where they might go,' Mr Shaw said.