>
 
FishingBoating-World.com
 
 
News Home Newsletters Photo Gallery Powerboat-World Australian Cruising World Cruising MarineBusiness-World Animated Knots
Video Gallery MarineBusiness-World
Sail-World.com : Bust-Up Basics
Bust-Up Basics


'Mackerel, like this big broad bar mack, will also get in on a bust-up, although the bigger fish tend to hang down beneath the surface frenzy'    Ben Knaggs

Nothing gets a fisho’s blood pumping like the sight of a big school of fish actively feeding on the surface. It’s a full-on feeding frenzy scenario, as the hyped-up predators blast through the surface, gorging themselves on small baitfish, while screeching seabirds dive-bomb from above to also cash in on a free feed. Exciting stuff!

Along WA’s north-west coast, right now is the time for some of the most reliable ‘bust-up’ action to be found. As water temperatures start to cool, schools of pelagic predators like longtail tuna, queenfish, Spanish mackerel and various trevallies push in to the north-west’s inshore waters, where they can be seen smashing into baitfish on a daily basis.

The tried and true technique for finding surface feeding pelagic fish is to simply follow the birds. It’s often been said that seabirds are the fisho’s eyes in the sky, and can signpost even the most subtle of bust-ups from miles away. It’s a pretty poor fisho that can’t recognize a big mob of birds all cannoning into the water probably means ‘fish here!’

Longtail tuna are the staple of bust up fishing in WA’s north west. These fish are usually most active of a morning or late afternoon -  Ben Knaggs  

Of course, not all surface feeding schools will have birds circling above. Plenty of times you’ll spot pelagics on the chop with not a feathered helper to be seen. To lock in on fish in these situations you need to use other observation skills.

You’ll rarely spot schools of surface schooling pelagics by looking for the fish themselves. Rather, it’s the movement of the fish through the water that gives away their location. Many times just a splash or two from a slashing fish is the only thing that alerts you to the location of a school, so any splash, no matter how seemingly insignificant, is worth checking out.

Schools of fish that aren’t actually feeding often create what is commonly referred to as ‘nervous water’ or sometimes a ‘breezer’ (the latter particularly with tuna). A decent school of fish swimming right on the surface creates a very distinct ripple that a trained eye can actually spot quite easily.

A stealthy approach to the feeding school of fish is the key to this fishing -  Ben Knaggs  

Once you’ve located surface feeding pelagics, the worst thing you can possibly do is charge straight into them with your outboard roaring. Do this and ninety nine times out of a hundred the fish will scatter as soon as you reach them. So whenever you approach a surface feeding school, do so with as much stealth as you can muster.

You’ll usually have to get to them quickly, lest the frenzy ends and the school goes down, so the trick is to get the boat up and racing toward them, and cut the motor the moment you’re almost within casting range. The momentum of the boat will then carry you close enough to fire out a cast, and hopefully the feeding fish won’t even notice you coming.

A pack of big longtail tuna tear into a bait school -  Ben Knaggs  

This doesn’t always work though, particularly when we’re dealing with fast moving and very spooking targets like longtail tuna. These fish often pop-up for just seconds at a time, which can be frustrating as you end up spending ages racing from school to school without ever getting to one in time to fire out a cast.

In this situation, try positioning your boat in the general area the fish are feeding and waiting for the school to come up within casting range. This ‘sit and wait’, silent approach can often work really well, especially if the terrified baitfish the fish are chasing decide your boat’s hull looks like a good hiding place!

This style of fishing is really a lure fishing scenario. Metal lures like slices, slugs and spoons, and soft plastic stickbaits are the workhorses of bust-up fishing, but surface lures like poppers and floating stickbaits are also worth carrying (mostly because they’re so much fun to fish with!), but tend to work best on fish that aren’t being really fussy.

Most of the time actually getting the bite is a piece of cake, as the fish are all hyped up and willing to hit anything that even remotely resembles a small, frightened baitfish. Yet at other times these same fish can be ultra-picky and very frustrating.

This tear-your-hair-out experience usually only occurs when the fish are totally focussed on a certain type of baitfish. Much lure swapping is usually the order of the day if this is the case, but what you will find is that lure size is usually the most important factor. If you can see the baitfish the fish are feeding on, try to use a lure that matches their size almost exactly.

Casting to hyped up schools of surface feeding pelagic fish rates very highly on the ‘enjoyability’ scale for most fishos. It’s sportfishing fun you can just never tire of, and WA’s north-west coast is one of the best areas of the country to find it.


by Ben Knaggs

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.fishingboating-world.com/index.cfm?nid=109093

12:51 PM Fri 3 May 2013GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.







FishingBoating-World







Roads and Maritime Services expand live vision of conditions by Transport Roads and Maritime Services,




























































Solarshield by Oceanair: Antiglare roller blind for Marine use
Superior SuperElite ends Townsville ramp rage
2014 warmest year since records began + Video
New Torquay Reef a boost for local jobs and local fishing
A life jacket made to display on a wall
Sea, road and air? Abell Point Marina has you covered
AMM takes small plate boats upmarket into ‘Sea Class’
Wahoo Smackdown VI Tournament - Marine artists are onboard
Go on a submarine adventure in a special family fun day at the museum
Go on undersea adventure in theatre show at National Maritime Museum
Sail-World.com - Contributors Guidelines *Feature
Marine Rescue Kioloa and Ulladulla vessels investigate flare sighting
Two men and 4-year-old missing on fishing trip off Jervis Bay
Summer reminder about yabby fishing rules
Wish a Marine Rescue NSW volunteer a happy New Year on Sydney Harbour
Stop thief! Spies nab Spy thieves
Stop thief! Spies nab Spy thieves
Marine Rescue Batemans Bay brings two home safe on Christmas Eve
Learn to make personal watercraft safety a priority this summer
2015 Victorian Recreational Fishing Guide is now available
2015 Lakefest Aquatic Week - A week-long celebration of boating   
Seven tips to get more out of a marine survey   
Marine Auctions raises the bar with live internet bidding for auctions   
You are what you eat – if you’re a coral reef fish   
Keep safe on the water this holiday season   
Sail-World new format - Important first visit changes needed   
Four new 'Fish Friendly Marina' accreditations announced   
Another successful auction year comes to a close at Runaway Bay Marina   
Marine Auctions is proud to announce the return of Bill Fankhauser   
Go on an underwater adventure this summer at the museum   
2014 Sanctuary Classic winners announced   
AMA raises concerns about banning small cottage based fishermen   
Club Marine's all-new TeleClaims and Online Claims   
Introduction of NSW's first combined car and boat licence   
Scientist explores mysterious food-borne illness: ciguatera   
Bum breathing icon’s future in doubt   
Three rescued from capsized boat in late night emergency   
Win $5000 Cash to Splash with Club Marine   
New exhibition takes kids on a Voyage to the Deep   
Anglers reminded about new Murray cod catch limits   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL NEW FBW
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT